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Stage 1

Stage 1

 

 

 

English

In English, students learn to read, write, talk and listen. They learn about English language and literature, how language varies according to context and how to communicate to a range of audiences for different purposes. They learn to read for information and for pleasure. They learn about poetry, novels and plays. They gain a sound grasp of language structures, punctuation, spelling and grammar.

Some Year 1 examples

  • listen to and follow a short procedure, eg carry out instructions for a simple task
  • communicate simple information, eg give directions to the library, provide a brief retelling of a familiar story
  • develop an increasing range of reading and comprehension skills on familiar topics, eg sound out unknown words or break them down into syllables, respond to punctuation when reading aloud, express opinions about characters in stories
  • produce simple written pieces on familiar topics, eg short recounts of personal experience, descriptions of family members
  • spell known sight words, eg ‘said’, ‘was’, ‘some’, ‘have’

Some Year 2 examples

  • listen attentively and share ideas or give information in group and class discussions, eg about familiar events or topics such as birthdays or sport
  • begin to read about less familiar topics
  • make inferences and predictions when reading stories to develop comprehension
  • use most common punctuation marks in writing, eg full stops, capital letters, spaces between words
  • use word processing software to produce simple writing, eg stories, invitations, recipes
  • use reading cues to understand written texts, eg matching letters to sounds (phonics) and breaking words into syllables

Mathematics

Mathematics develops students’ thinking, understanding, competence and confidence with numbers, shapes and measurement. Students learn to add, subtract, divide and multiply whole numbers, fractions and decimals. They learn to measure time and calculate with money. They learn geometry, algebra and how to work with data and graphs.

Some Year 1 examples

  • state the place value of digits in two-digit numbers, eg ‘in the number 32, the 3 represents 30 or 3 tens’
  • begin to model multiplication using concrete objects, eg 3 x 2 is the same as 3 groups of 2 or as an array with 3 rows of 2
  • describe halves and quarters found in everyday life, eg quarters of an orange, half a glass of water
  • begin to use metres and centimetres to estimate and measure length and distance, eg ‘My book is 30 cm long’, ‘My desk is more than a metre wide’
  • count forwards and backwards by two, fives and tens
  • use the terms ‘add’, ‘plus’, ‘equals’, ‘is equal to’, ‘take away’, ‘minus’ and ‘the difference between’

Some Year 2 examples

  • read clocks on the half-hour
  • count, read and write numbers up to 999
  • begin to model division using concrete objects, eg 6 ÷ 3 is the same as sharing 6 objects into 3 equal groups
  • record area by describing the number and type of units, eg the area of this surface is 20 tiles
  • use a calendar to identify dates, months, seasons and birthdays
  • begin to understand and draw graphs and diagrams of data, eg using simple picture graphs and column graphs
  • recognise and explain numbers such as odds and evens, numbers ending with five and zero

Science and Technology

Science and Technology develops students’ skills in thinking, investigating and problem-solving. It gives them knowledge and skills in scientific investigation, design and applied technology. This subject builds on the curiosity children have about their natural and built environments.

Some Year 1 and Year 2 examples

  • observe patterns and suggest possible explanations, eg observing, recording and classifying vehicles passing the school, and creating a class graph
  • observe and record the changes in a living thing such as a deciduous tree over a season or the growth of seeds to sprouts
  • explore magnets and their properties
  • talk about how living things depend on their environment
  • observe animal life, eg ants, silkworms

Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)

In Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) students learn about history, geography, civics and citizenship. They investigate their personal and community identity, and gain an understanding of their nation and its place in the world. They learn to participate effectively in maintaining and improving the quality of their society and environment.

Some Year 1 and Year 2 examples

  • talk about the lives of people in their family and community, past and present
  • talk about customs, practices, symbols, languages and traditions of their family and other people they know who belong to different groups and families
  • recognise Aboriginal people as the first Australians
  • learn about their local community and how it has changed over time
  • use maps and globes to locate places and countries
  • show an understanding of the relationship between environments and people and what they can do to help protect their environment

Creative Arts

Creative Arts gives students experiences in the visual arts, music, drama and dance. They have opportunities to explore their creativity in each of these areas. They learn to appreciate the meanings and values that each artform offers. They perform and express themselves through the visual arts, music, drama and dance.

Some Year 1 and Year 2 examples

  • sing songs, play and move to music using their voices, percussion instruments
  • move to music in a variety of ways, such as imagining they are a machine or a butterfly
  • dramatise a story, eg Possum Magic
  • create sculptures and 3-D models using a variety of techniques such as carving, cutting, modelling clay, and simple print techniques such as screen printing
  • talk about how music can represent different things – a circus, or sunshine as in ‘Morning’ from Peer Gynt by Grieg, for example

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE)

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE) develops the knowledge, skills and attitudes students need to lead healthy, active and fulfilling lives. Students learn about the importance of good food and regular exercise. They learn how bodies grow and change over time. They learn skills to play individual and team sports, and the values of sportsmanship and teamwork.

Some Year 1 and Year 2 examples

  • identify medicines and describe how they are safely used and stored
  • learn and practise fundamental movement skills including hop, skip, kick, overarm throw
  • identify the qualities of positive relationships, eg cooperation and caring for others
  • recognise choices that keep them healthy and safe, eg sun protection, eating habits, participation in physical activity
  • link movement skills together in simple sequences, eg jump-hop-run
  • display cooperation with others, eg taking turns