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Stage 2

Stage 2

 

 

 

English

In English, students learn to read, write, talk and listen. They learn about English language and literature, how language varies according to context and how to communicate to a range of audiences for different purposes. They learn to read for information and for pleasure. They learn about poetry, novels and plays. They gain a sound grasp of language structures, punctuation, spelling and grammar.

Some Year 3 examples

  • communicate for a range of purposes and audiences, eg conduct brief interviews to obtain information, give instructions for making a piece of craft
  • use a wider range of reading strategies to confirm predictions and locate information, eg skim read using headings, sub-headings, key words, layout and graphics
  • self-correct a broader range of punctuation in own writing, eg question marks, commas, apostrophes for contractions, quotation marks for written speech
  • begin to produce different forms of electronic publishing, eg slide shows, multimedia
  • spell familiar words using knowledge of common letter patterns and sound sequences, eg high, thigh, thought, bought

Some Year 4 examples

  • employ various speaking skills to give confident oral presentations, eg gesture, facial expression, pause, emphasis, volume, clarity
  • begin reading about more challenging topics, eg biography of a famous person, an historical event
  • develop a wider range of responses to reading, eg identify writer’s viewpoint, describe and compare different interpretations, identify stereotypes and symbolic meanings
  • produce more complex pieces of writing, eg an explanation of how a specialised machine works or what causes a specific natural process
  • use a variety of skills to produce well-structured writing, eg drafting, revising and proofreading

Mathematics

Mathematics develops students’ thinking, understanding, competence and confidence with numbers, shapes and measurement. Students learn to add, subtract, divide and multiply whole numbers, fractions and decimals. They learn to measure time and calculate with money. They learn geometry, algebra and how to work with data and graphs.

Some Year 3 examples

  • develop mental strategies to multiply a two-digit number by a one-digit number, eg using known facts, multiplying the tens and then the ones, repeatedly doubling when multiplying by an even number
  • count, read, write and order numbers up to 9999
  • identify, represent and compare fractions involving halves, quarters, and eighths
  • interpret decimal notation for tenths and hundredths, eg 0.1 is the same as 1/10
  • identify and measure the length, breadth, height and perimeter of objects in metres, centimetres and millimetres
  • record area in square centimetres and square metres, eg 5 cm2, 6 m2
  • recall multiplication facts (‘times tables’) up to 10 x 10
  • organise data to create and interpret tables and graphs

Some Year 4 examples

  • read and record time in one-minute intervals
  • record numbers up to four digits using expanded notation, eg 5429 = 5000 + 400 + 20 + 9
  • develop mental strategies to divide by a one-digit number, eg ‘63 ÷ 9 = 7 because I know 7 x 9 = 63’
  • determine factors for a given number, eg ‘factors of 12 are 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, 12’
  • add and subtract decimals with the same number of decimal places (up to 2 decimal places), eg 0.10 + 0.33 = 0.43
  • relate common percentages to a fraction or decimal, eg ‘25% means 25 out of 100 or 0.25’
  • manipulate, compare and describe features of 2-D shapes, eg pentagons, octagons, parallelograms
  • record volume and capacity using litres, millilitres and cubic centimetres, eg 5 L, 6 mL, 27 cm3
  • use coordinates and compass points to describe position and to give and follow directions, eg ‘the lion cage is at B3’, ‘the treasure is north-east of the cave’

Science and Technology

Science and Technology develops students’ skills in thinking, investigating and problem-solving. It gives them knowledge and skills in scientific investigation, design and applied technology. This subject builds on the curiosity children have about their natural and built environments.

Some Year 3 and Year 4 examples

  • observe and report on a local environment, eg a park, beach or wetland
  • design and make models using sticks, timber, cardboard, bark, glue and fabric. Models might include an early settler’s hut, an underwater world or a space world
  • describe how plants and animals rely on each other in a ‘mini environment’, eg a park, the playground or a lake area
  • research and record phases of the moon over time and propose explanations as to why it changes

Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE)

In Human Society and Its Environment (HSIE) students learn about history, geography, civics and citizenship. They investigate their personal and community identity, and gain an understanding of their nation and its place in the world. They learn to participate effectively in maintaining and improving the quality of their society and environment.

Some Year 3 and Year 4 examples

  • learn that Australian history spans thousands of years
  • talk about and identify different roles and responsibilities within the school and community
  • investigate the various ways to care for the local environment and what they can do at home and school to help protect the environment
  • investigate the local area to identify important people in history
  • describe similarities and differences between communities in Australia, Asia and other places in the world, including religions, languages and cultures
  • learn about early Australian explorers, eg Bass and Flinders

Creative Arts

Creative Arts gives students experiences in the visual arts, music, drama and dance. They have opportunities to explore their creativity in each of these areas. They learn to appreciate the meanings and values that each artform offers. They perform and express themselves through the visual arts, music, drama and dance.

Some Year 3 and Year 4 examples

  • focus more on detail of artwork subject matter, such as facial expressions, body angles
  • sing and move to the beat of music, identify structure and changes in pitch, tempo and beat
  • develop dance performances using known dance movements and improvised moves to create a sequence
  • play music using percussion instruments such as drums, triangles or maracas, as well as clapping, tapping of hands and feet
  • follow percussion charts to create a group musical performance
  • role-play characters from plays, working in groups as well as individual roles

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE)

Personal Development, Health and Physical Education (PDHPE) develops the knowledge, skills and attitudes students need to lead healthy, active and fulfilling lives. Students learn about the importance of good food and regular exercise. They learn how bodies grow and change over time. They learn skills to play individual and team sports, and the values of sportsmanship and teamwork.

Some Year 3 and Year 4 examples

  • become aware of the influences on healthy choices, eg television advertising and unhealthy eating
  • practise fundamental movement skills in different physical activities, eg playing with a racquet or bat
  • learn the rules and play a range of team sports in class and school teams
  • realise the harm that can be caused by drugs, tobacco and alcohol
  • identify the body changes that occur throughout life
  • participate in a range of physical activities and learn how they contribute to a healthy and active lifestyle